Donation Info

To give blood you must be in good health, 17 years or older (or 16 with parental permission), weigh at least 110 pounds and show a valid photo I.D.

Am I Eligible?

LifeSouth Locations

 

Florida Donor Centers

Alachua

15652 NW US Hwy 441 Suite F
Alachua, FL 32615
386-418-0210

Hours of Operation:
Mon: Closed
Tue: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: Closed

Brooksville

12395 Cortez Boulevard
Brooksville, FL 34613
352-596-2002

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. *
Tue: 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. *
Wed: 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. *
Thu: 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. *
Fri: 8:00 a.m. – 5 p.m. *
Sat: 7 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: 9:30 a.m. – 4 p.m.

*Apheresis appointments are available to donors at 7:30 a.m. on these days.

Chiefland

2202 N Young Boulevard
Chiefland, FL 32626
352-490-7410

Hours of Operation:
Monday: Closed
Tue: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: Closed

Gainesville - 13th Street

1221 NW 13th Street
Gainesville, FL 32601
352-334-1000

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

 

Gainesville - Newberry Road

4039 Newberry Road
Gainesville, FL 32607
352-224-1600

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tue: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Thu: 10 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

 

Inverness

2629 E Gulf to Lake Highway Ste A7
Inverness, FL 34453
352-344-5332

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 8 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 8 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Sun: 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Jacksonville

Jacksonville Distribution Center
7033-14 Commonwealth Ave.
Jacksonville, Florida 32220

Lake City

833 SW State Road 47
Lake City, FL 32025
386-755-0480

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: 11 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Lecanto

1241 S. Lecanto Highway
Lecanto, FL 34461
352-527-3061

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed: 8:30 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Thu: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 8:30 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 8:30 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: Closed

Ocala

1607 E. Silver Springs Boulevard
Ocala, FL 34470
352-622-3544

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Palatka

6003 Crill Avenue
Palatka, FL 32177
386-328-7299

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.

Georgia Donor Centers

Atlanta

4891 Ashford Dunwoody Road
Atlanta, GA 30338
404-329-1994

Hours of Operation:
Mon:  9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue:  9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed:  9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu:  9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri:  9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Sat:   9 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Sun:  Noon – 4 p.m.

Gainesville

1200 McEver Road
Gainesville, GA 30504
770-538-0500

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: Noon – 4 p.m.

McDonough

329 Westridge Parkway
McDonough, GA 30253
678-432-0637

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sat: 8 a.m. – 2 p.m.
Sun: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Alabama Donor Centers

Albertville

8626 Highway 431
Albertville, AL 35950
256-894-6066

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: Closed
Sun: Closed

Birmingham

396 West Oxmoor Road
Birmingham, AL 35209
205-943-6000

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. -3 p.m.
Sun: 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Birmingham - Brookwood Hospital

2010 Brookwood Medical Center Drive
Birmingham, AL 35209
205-445-0667

Hours of Operation
Mon: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Tue: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Wed: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Thu: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Fri: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.
Sat: Closed
Sun: Closed

*Note: Brookwood + St. Vincent’s Donor Centers close from 12-1 for lunch.

Birmingham - St. Vincent's East Hospital

50 Medical Park East Drive
Birmingham, AL 35235
205-833-3557

Hours of Operation
Mon – Fri: 7 a.m. – 4 p.m.

*Note: Brookwood + St. Vincent’s Donor Centers close from 12-1 for lunch.

Cullman

112 Clark Street NE
Cullman, AL 35055
256-736-1594

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: Closed
Sun: Closed

Daphne

26125 Capital Drive
Daphne, AL 36526
251-621-9644

Hours of Operation:
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 6 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 8 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: 10 a.m. – 2 p.m.

Decatur

2349 Danville Road SW, Suite 120
Decatur, AL 35603
256-552-0060

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: 8 a.m. – Noon

Dothan

3833 Ross Clark Circle
Dothan, AL 36303
334-792-9977

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 10 a.m. -3 p.m.
Sun: Closed

Florence

Eliza Coffee Memorial Hospital Donor Center
205 Marengo Street
Florence, AL 35630
256-765-7038

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: 1 p.m.- 5 p.m.

Huntsville - Huntsville Hospital

Huntsville Hospital
101 Sivley Road
Huntsville, AL 35801
256-265-6340

Hours of Operation
Mon: 7 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Tue: 7 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Wed: 7 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Thu: 7 a.m. – 5:30 p.m.
Fri: 7 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Madison

8190 Madison Blvd.
Madison, AL 35758
256-533-8201

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: Closed
Sun: Closed

Mobile

967 Hillcrest Road
Mobile, AL 36695
251-706-1470

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: 12 p.m. – 4 p.m.

Montgomery

4139 Carmichael Road
Montgomery, AL 36106
334-260-0803

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: 1 p.m. – 5 p.m.

Opelika

505 East Thomason Circle
Opelika, AL 36801
334-705-0884

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 7 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: 9 a.m. – 3 p.m.
Sun: Noon – 5 p.m.

Sheffield

1208 South Jackson Highway
Sheffield, AL 35660
256-383-3535

Hours of Operation
Mon: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Tue: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Wed: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Thu: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Fri: 9 a.m. – 5 p.m.
Sat: Closed
Sun: Closed

Not near a center? Use our blood drive locator to find a bloodmobile near you.

Blood Drive Locator


What's My Type?

O –

O –

The best donation for your type is a double red cell donation.

•O-negative is pretty rare, only nine percent of Americans have it.
•100 percent of us can use O-negative red blood cells in an emergency.
•You are the universal donor, and O-negative is the blood type hospitals always want on stand-by for emergencies.
•It’s also the only type your fellow O-negative people can use.

O +

O +

The best donation for your type is platelets.

•You have the most common blood type in the U.S.
•37.6 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•You can help anyone with a positive blood type – that’s 85 percent of the people who might need blood.

A –

A –

The best donation for your type is platelets with a concurrent red or double red cell donation.

•Only about 6.3 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•Your red blood cells can also be used by people who are A-positive and anyone with AB-positive or AB-negative blood types.
•Your fellow A-negative donors and the O-negative donors can help you if you ever need blood.

A +

A +

The best donation for your type is platelets.

•You can receive blood from 86% of the population.
•Your blood type is the second most common in the U.S.
•Your red blood cells could help your fellow A-positive people and those who are AB-positive.
•The O-positive, O-negative and A-negative donors can also help you.

O –

The best donation for your type is a double red cell donation.

•O-negative is pretty rare, only nine percent of Americans have it.
•100 percent of us can use O-negative red blood cells in an emergency.
•You are the universal donor, and O-negative is the blood type hospitals always want on stand-by for emergencies.
•It’s also the only type your fellow O-negative people can use.

O +

The best donation for your type is platelets.

•You have the most common blood type in the U.S.
•37.6 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•You can help anyone with a positive blood type – that’s 85 percent of the people who might need blood.

A –

The best donation for your type is platelets with a concurrent red or double red cell donation.

•Only about 6.3 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•Your red blood cells can also be used by people who are A-positive and anyone with AB-positive or AB-negative blood types.
•Your fellow A-negative donors and the O-negative donors can help you if you ever need blood.

A +

The best donation for your type is platelets.

•You can receive blood from 86% of the population.
•Your blood type is the second most common in the U.S.
•Your red blood cells could help your fellow A-positive people and those who are AB-positive.
•The O-positive, O-negative and A-negative donors can also help you.

B –

B –

The best donation for your type is platelets with a concurrent red or double red cell donation.

•Negative blood types are more rare compared to positive types
•B-negative is the second most rare of all types with only 2 percent of the population sharing your blood type.
•You can only receive blood from B-negative or O-negative donors, but your blood can help patients with B-positive, B-negative, AB-positive and AB-negative blood types.

B +

B +

The best donation for your type is platelets.

•Only 8.5 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•You can help your fellow B-positive donors, and those with AB-positive blood.
•If you ever need help, the O-negative and O-positive donors are there for you, along with B-negative and your fellow B-positive donors.

AB –

AB –

The best donation for your type is platelets and plasma.

•You have the rarest of all blood types in the U.S.
•Only 0.6 percent of Americans have your type.
•You are the universal donor for plasma.
•In an emergency, you can help anyone needing a plasma transfusion.

 

AB +

AB +

The best donation for your type is plasma.

•Only 3.4 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•In an emergency you can receive red blood cells from any other blood donor, no matter their type.
•You are the universal receiver.

B –

The best donation for your type is platelets with a concurrent red or double red cell donation.

•Negative blood types are more rare compared to positive types
•B-negative is the second most rare of all types with only 2 percent of the population sharing your blood type.
•You can only receive blood from B-negative or O-negative donors, but your blood can help patients with B-positive, B-negative, AB-positive and AB-negative blood types.

B +

The best donation for your type is platelets.

•Only 8.5 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•You can help your fellow B-positive donors, and those with AB-positive blood.
•If you ever need help, the O-negative and O-positive donors are there for you, along with B-negative and your fellow B-positive donors.

AB –

The best donation for your type is platelets and plasma.

•You have the rarest of all blood types in the U.S.
•Only 0.6 percent of Americans have your type.
•You are the universal donor for plasma.
•In an emergency, you can help anyone needing a plasma transfusion.

 

AB +

The best donation for your type is plasma.

•Only 3.4 percent of Americans have your blood type.
•In an emergency you can receive red blood cells from any other blood donor, no matter their type.
•You are the universal receiver.

Types of Donations

Whole Blood

Whole blood donation is the most common type of blood donation. You can donate whole blood every 56 days.

After donation, the blood is separated into three components: red blood cells, platelets and plasma.

Whole blood donors are always needed to replenish the blood supply, especially donors with, A negative, B negative and O blood types. O negative can be given to patients with any blood type and is often used in emergencies and traumas.

Double Red

Double red cell donations are very much like whole blood donations. If you meet certain criteria, double red cell donation allows you to safely donate two units of red cells during one appointment allowing you to maximize your donation and your time.

This procedure is great for donors with a much needed blood type and an extremely busy schedule. You can donate double red every 112 days.

Blood types that are preferred for this procedure include: O, A negative or B negative. Donating double red cells takes about 20-30 minutes longer than a whole blood donation and you can donate approximately every four months.

Platelets & Plasma

Platelets and plasma are donated through the process of apheresis. Apheresis (pronounced ay-fer-ee-sis) is a Greek word meaning “to separate” or “to take away.” You can donate platelets every two weeks and plasma every four weeks.

Platelet transfusions are essential in treating many different types of cancer. Platelets function in the body to help clotting by sticking to the lining of blood vessels. They help prevent massive blood loss resulting from trauma and blood vessel leakage. A platelet donation provides as many of these blood-clotting cells as around five whole blood donations.

A platelet donation takes approximately 1-2 hours. LifeSouth provides televisions, comfortable chairs, snacks and drinks to help keep you comfortable during your donation.

Platelets and plasma are needed from O positive, A, B and AB blood types.

Sickle Cell

Patients who have sickle cell, a genetic blood disorder that affects the body’s red blood cells, may need many blood transfusions in a lifetime, some as frequently as every four weeks. While transfusions can increase the amount of healthy red blood cells, multiple transfusions can cause complications.

To reduce complications, finding donors whose blood types more precisely match these patients is crucial. Donate blood with LifeSouth Community Blood Centers, and your blood will be tested to see if you are a special match for a patient with sickle cell disease.

Sickle cell disease predominately affects African-Americans, and matches are much more likely to be found within a patient’s own ethnic group.

Learn more about Sickle Cell Anemia and Sickle Cell Heroes here.

Cord Blood

LifeCord is a community-based public cord blood bank that collects and stores umbilical cord blood for the purpose of clinical cures and basic research in the field of stem cell transplantation.

We participate in the network of public cord blood banks affiliated with the National Marrow Donor Program’s (NMDP) Be The Match Registry and the Center for International Blood and Marrow Transplant Research (CIBMTR).

LifeCord is a program of LifeSouth, which performs community and donor education, cord blood collection and processing, distribution of the cord blood units, and evaluation of transplant outcomes. We also work to increase the diversity of donors from which cord blood is collected. Click here to learn more about cord donation.

Autologous

An autologous blood collection is when a patient provides his or her own blood before a scheduled surgery. Procedures like bilateral knee or hip replacement, knee or hip revision, complex revisions of cardiac procedures, and complex spinal surgeries are likely candidates for an autologous donation. Your physician should send a completed Request for Autologous Collections form to the nearest LifeSouth Donor Center. If the request is approved, you will be scheduled for the collection. Ideally, we ask that you call the blood center to verify approval of the request and, if approved, to schedule an appointment at your convenience.

Some patients, for various reasons, are not good candidates for self-donations. Other patients have medical problems requiring clearance by a medical specialist before they can donate blood. Some procedures rarely, if ever, require transfusion, so self-donation is not necessary.




Donation Information

LifeSouth is a community blood center, meaning the blood supply collected from our donors directly serves the needs of patients in our community. As a blood donor, you are a part of a team of individuals helping save the lives of patients in our community.

To give blood you must be in good health, 17 years-old or older or 16-year-old with parental permission, weigh at least 110 pounds and show a valid photo I.D.

Can I donate?

Below are instances that may prevent you from donating. To take this information on-the-go refer to our donor education materials. Our regulations continually change, so do not self defer, a patient could be counting on you! If you have further questions, please contact us.

Age

We require all donors be at least 17 years-old or 16-years-old with a signed permission form from their parent or a guardian before the donation.

Anemia/Low Iron

Low iron is not the same as being anemic; anemia must be diagnosed by a doctor. LifeSouth requires a hemoglobin level of 12.5 g/dL females and 13.0 g/dL males due to the American Association of Blood Banks suggested regulations. Some anemia is not due to inadequate iron consumption. If you are chronically anemic, please consult a physician.

Learn more about iron here.

Tattoos

There is no deferral period for those who have received tattoos in Alabama or Florida, or where tattoo parlors are regulated. However, there is a 12-month deferral period from the date of the tattoo application if the tattoo was received in Georgia.

High Blood Pressure

Blood pressure is checked before every donation to make sure it is within an acceptable range. Medication for high blood pressure is also permissible.

Diabetes

If your diabetes is being treated and is under control, you are most likely able to donate blood.

Medication

Aspirin and ibuprofen will not affect a whole blood donation. Apheresis platelet donors, however, must not take aspirin or aspirin products 48 hours prior to donation. Many other medications are acceptable. It is recommended that you check with your physician ahead of time to inquire about any medications you are taking.

While many medications may prevent you from giving blood, you may still be able to donate while taking medications in the treatment of non-infectious diseases such as arthritis, chronic pain, gout, etc.

Travel

Blood donor tests may not be available for some contagious diseases that are found only in certain countries. If you were born in, have lived in, or visited certain countries, you may not be eligible to donate. If you have traveled extensively, it may help if you bring your passport with you when you donate.

We will ask you about traveling you’ve done in the last three years. Please tell us about your travel history so that we can assess your risk.

Cancer

Donors with a history of cancer must be evaluated and deemed eligible to donate. If you have had leukemia or lymphoma, you are not eligible to donate. Donors with other types of cancer are acceptable, provided they are not currently undergoing treatment.

Pregnancy

If you are currently pregnant or have been recently pregnant, you should not donate blood for at least six weeks.

Pregnancy may cause women to develop antibodies to the fetus that is why additional laboratory testing may be needed to ensure that all components of their platelets and plasma are safe to transfuse. Multiple pregnancies increase the likelihood that a woman will develop these types of antibodies. These antibodies have no affect on the woman’s health, but when transfused to another person, they may cause an adverse reaction.


Donor Thank You Gift

Here are our current rewards for the following months, while supplies last.


Patient Stories

To inspire people to give blood, we have found that the best motivation is to understand the patients who need blood in our community. Below is a collection of patient stories that we hope inspires you to donate today.

If you have a story to share contact us here.

Doug Faulkner was “just a kid” living in New York when he first decided to give blood.

Doug Faulkner was “just a kid” living in New York when he first decided to give blood and didn’t think much of it, other than it was a good thing to do and he liked the idea of helping people. Now, at 90-years-old, he has donated more than 233 times and has been donating at our Citrus Region regularly since 1993.

“You don’t realize until you read it, what 23 years does and how it helps so many people,” he said after reading the article published in the Citrus County Chronicle about his donation history. Faulkner recommends donating to anyone that is eligible, “If your doctor says you can do it, do it. It doesn’t require anything, just a little pin prick.”

He knows several people who receive platelets, which encourages him to donate even more due to his personal connection. “Anybody who doesn’t donate is foolish. They don’t know how they can help a person,” Faulkner said.

Logan can continue playing with trains because of donors like you.

Back in 2009, Audra Blocker noticed her 8-month-old son Logan was covered with a head-to-toe rash and running a fever of 104 degrees. On Christmas Day, he was admitted to to the hospital when doctors noticed the skin on his fingers and toes was peeling and he was diagnosed with Kawasaki Disease, a rare disease that causes inflammation of some blood vessels in the body.

Logan received intravenous treatments from a product made from human plasma, the liquid portion of blood that comes from donors. It’s one of the many ways LifeSouth blood donors can help save lives. And for six months he took a baby aspirin a day. Today, he has no serious after effects from his scary first Christmas.

“Blood donors helped save my baby’s life.” said Audra, now a LifeSouth blood donor. Logan loves basketball, and anything to do with Thomas the Train - he even wants to be an engineer when he grows up.

Susan Hanson made a vow to her father.

For Susan Hanson of Dothan, Alabama, donating blood is certainly an interest that runs in the family.

Her father, a Korean War veteran, first donated to save the life of a fellow soldier who shared his blood type. After that, he continued to give blood, eventually reaching nearly 13 gallons in his lifetime. Susan began donating in 1980 with the goal to eventually pass that mark.

Today, she is one pint away from 13 gallons and doesn’t plan on slowing down. “I think once I catch up to his 13 gallon point, if they need platelets more than they need whole blood I’ll probably start donating more platelets,” she said. She also hopes to start seeing more people begin to donate blood. “It doesn’t cost you anything, it doesn’t hurt, it’s a little needle stick, and you can save lives with your efforts.”

Samuel Rivers gets a special feeling whenever he sees a LifeSouth Bloodmobile.

Samuel, 40, was born with sickle cell disease, and transfusions are a way of life in coping with the hereditary condition. For the past 13 years, he has received a transfusion every four weeks, and more times than he can count, that blood has come from a LifeSouth donor. Without them, he says, he never would have reached his 40th birthday and be able to raise his son.

Through a special program called Sickle Cell Heroes, LifeSouth looks for these donors whose special blood type causes fewer complications for sickle cell patients and others who receive numerous transfusions.

Platelets saved Kaedyn's life.

When Kaedyn was nine months old, his parents noticed his cheeks were swollen and he seemed irritable. After two trips to the doctor and two visits to the emergency room, Kaedyn was diagnosed with leukemia. He was taken immediately to the hospital where he received transfusions of red blood cells and platelets while undergoing chemotherapy.

During those first rounds of treatment he was receiving blood transfusions nearly every day. With the help of blood donors he lived to keep on fighting.

While his disease is in remission and the treatments have stopped, Kaedyn and his mother Shelsie still travel to Shands Hospital at the University of Florida in Gainesville for monthly check-ups.

Jeff and Brooke Walker need only to look at their twin daughters to see the power of blood donation.

Brooke had experienced a completely normal pregnancy until it came time for their birth. By the end of that day, Brooke needed six units of blood, the oldest twin Bailey needed two units of blood, while her smaller little sister Brenna needed a single unit.

Brooke and Jeff were both blood donors even before that day. “It hits closer to home now. I wouldn’t have all three of them with me today,” Jeff said. “When I pray, I think about how blessed we are and how lucky we are,” added Brooke, who says she sees donation as “our best chance to pay it forward.”

Elijah is a sickle cell fighter, but his fight still has a long way to go.

A month after Elijah Cook was born he was diagnosed with sickle cell anemia. An inherited blood disorder that causes normally round and flexible red blood cells to become stiff and crescent shaped, sickle cell anemia leaves blood cells unable to travel through the body and deliver oxygen.

There are many symptoms and complications due to sickle cell such as stroke, organ damage, episodes of pain and aplastic crisis, where your body stops producing red blood cells.

Eli is a fighter, but throughout his life will need to receive multiple blood transfusions to prevent and manage his symptoms. Since matches for transfusions tend to be found within the patient's own ethnic background, black and Africa-American donors may be Elijah's best hope.


Hosting a blood drive

To host a blood drive in your community, you will serve as Donor Chairperson, a vital link between your organization and LifeSouth. As a Chairperson you will work with a LifeSouth Team and Donor Recruiter to schedule, organize and promote your blood drives. Depending upon the size of your organization, it may be best to establish a blood drive committee of outgoing, dependable people who will help to ensure that your organization meets its blood drive goal. The most important ingredient in creating a successful blood drive is personal contact. Studies have shown that the most common reason people have not donated is because no one has asked them.

Interested in hosting your own community blood drive? For more information on hosting a blood drive, send us an email.

If you’re already a volunteer chairperson looking for more resources, follow the button below.

2017 Summer Campaign Flyer

Permission for Minor to Donate Form


Frequently Asked Questions

Can I Donate?

What age and weight do you have to be to donate blood?

Donors must be at least 17 years old (16 year olds may donate with written parental consent) and weigh at least 110 pounds. There is no upper age limit to donate blood.

Can I donate if I weigh less than 110 lbs. and give less than one pint of blood?

Generally, no. Blood donations take a standard amount of blood from each donor; around 500ml (slightly less than one pint) for the donation to make a difference for a patient.

Can I donate if I have a tattoo?

There is not a deferral period in Alabama or Florida where tattoo parlors are regulated. There is a 12 month deferral period from the date of the tattoo application for Georgia donors.

Can I donate if I have a piercing?

If the piercing was done under aseptic (sterile) conditions with single-use equipment, there is no deferral period. If a sterile needle was NOT used, the deferral period is 12 months due to the risk of infection.

Can I donate if I'm pregnant?

You cannot donate if you’re currently pregnant or have been pregnant in the past 6 weeks.

Can I donate if I have diabetes?

Yes, donors with diabetes are eligible to donate.

Can I donate if I'm sick?

If you have any cold symptoms, it is best that you fully recover before donating, as donating blood can make the effects of common colds worse.

Can I get AIDS or HIV from donating?

No. Sterile procedures, materials and disposable equipment are used in all LifeSouth blood centers. You cannot contract HIV or other viral diseases by donating blood.

Can I donate if I have low iron?

Low iron is not the same as being anemic; anemia must be diagnosed by a doctor. LifeSouth requires a hemoglobin level of 12.5 d/dL females and 13.0 g/dL males due to the American Association of Blood Banks suggested regulations. Some anemia is not due to inadequate iron consumption. If you are chronically anemic, please consult a physician.

Learn more about iron here.

Can I donate if I have/had mononucleosis?

If you’ve been diagnosed with “mono,” as long as you have fully recovered, you are eligible to donate. Discuss this during your donor interview to determine your eligibility.

Can I donate if I have cancer?

Leukemia, lymphoma and blood-cell related cancers are a permanent deferral, but donation is possible with other types of cancer if the person is in full remission with no other treatment scheduled.

Can I donate if I have traveled recently?

Having traveled or lived outside of the U.S. doesn’t carry an automatic deferral. The FDA determines which areas may pose a risk, and the areas can change. For an updated list of areas that can defer you call us at 888-795-2707.

Can I donate with high blood pressure?

Unless levels are extremely high, donation is possible. The medications taken for high blood pressure are also permissible. Blood pressure is checked before every donation to make sure it is within an acceptable range.

Donation Process

What is the donation process?

Donating blood is usually a simple and pleasant procedure. Your total time at the blood center or the bloodmobile will take about an hour.

  • Step 1 – Registration: Your information will be accessed in our computer system by your name or social security number and you will be asked to verify your name, address and phone number. If you are a first time donor, you will be asked your name, address and additional information and you will be entered into the system as a donor. You will need to show current photo I.D. to the registrar each time you donate.
  • Step 2 – Interview and Mini-Physical: You will answer questions about your medical history and questions determining if you practice high risk activities for contracting HIV, hepatitis and other diseases that are harmful to the blood supply. A mini-physical will be performed to determine your blood pressure, temperature, pulse and iron level to ensure you are healthy enough to give blood.
  • Step 3 – Donation Preparation: As you rest in the donor chair, the phlebotomist will check your veins, swab your arm with iodine and prepare the bag and other materials needed to collect your blood donation.
  • Step 4 – Blood Donation and Recovery: The actual donation time takes between four and eight minutes and, for most people, is a very comfortable process. The phlebotomist will also take four vials of blood for testing before the needle is removed from your arm.
  • Step 5 – Relax: You will be offered juice and snacks and encouraged to relax for several minutes after your donation is complete.

If you’ve donated, please take a moment to fill out our donor survey:

LifeSouth Donor Survey

Should I eat before donating?

At LifeSouth, we strongly recommend a meal or snack within two hours prior to donating blood.

What credentials do I need to donate blood?

We are not allowed to take your blood donation without first seeing an official form of identification. It must show proof of age, your signature and/or your photo. An example of such identification would be a valid passport or driver’s license.

What can I expect when donating whole blood?

First you must show a valid photo I.D. Then a donor technician completes computer registration for your donation. Then you answer questions relating to your medical history. A brief “mini-physical” tests your blood pressure, the iron content of your blood, your body temperature and pulse. The actual whole blood donation only lasts between four and eight minutes. Donors are asked to rest afterwards for about ten minutes before leaving. The entire donation process takes approximately 45 minutes.

Does it hurt to donate blood?

There may be a little sting when the needle is inserted, but there should be no pain during the donation.

How often can I donate blood or platelets?

You must wait at least 56 days between donations of whole blood and 16 weeks (112 days) between double red cell donations. Platelet apheresis donors may give every 2 weeks for a max of 24 times per year.

Will I feel faint?

Donors are served refreshments and encouraged to stay in the donor chair for a short time after donating. Occasional light-headedness may occur, especially if a donor leaves the chair before having a short rest, or uses alcohol or tobacco products soon after the donation.

What are the different components that are taken from blood?

The pint of donated blood is separated into three components; red blood cells, plasma and platelets. If needed, two additional components may be made from a pint of blood; cryoprecipitate and white blood cells. The blood components are then stored until they are needed. Patients only receive the blood components that their body lacks. Some patients, such as cancer patients, may only need platelets. Burn patients may need plasma. Patients that have lost a great deal of blood due to trauma injuries, transplants or major surgery may require transfusions of all blood components.

Post-Donation

Will I be notified if I test positive for a disease?

Donors who test positive for infectious diseases will be notified based on state/federal regulations.

What is an antibody?

The body makes antibodies in response to foreign antigens (those you were not born with). If you receive a blood transfusion or if you are pregnant, you may be exposed to red blood cell antigens that differ from the ones you were born with. Since your body views these antigens as foreign, your body makes antibodies to defend itself against the foreign red blood cell antigens. These types of antibodies are called “unexpected red blood cell antibodies.”

If I'm notified that I have a positive antibody screen, should I do anything further?

You may wish to share this information with your doctor. While the positive antibody has no immediate impact on your health, if you ever need a blood transfusion, the fact that you have a positive antibody will be used to determine the blood most suited for any future need of blood transfusion.

What is an antigen?

Antigens are substances recognized by the body as foreign. A foreign antigen causes the body to produce an antibody to react with the antigen.

Blood antigens are found in everyone’s body. Specific antigens are attached to the red blood cells. The specific red blood cell antigens a person has are set at birth. These antigens determine your blood type. For example, people who have a blood type of A+ have the “A” antigen and the “Rh” antigen attached to their red blood cells. Your body will not recognize the antigens associated with your blood type as foreign. It basically ignores these antigens.

What does it mean if I have a positive antibody screen?

The blood center tests all blood donors for the presence of unexpected red blood cell antibodies because the donated blood may cause transfusion reactions.

A positive antibody screen test is no cause for alarm; it is very common. It simply means that testing has shown you may have unexpected red blood cell antibodies.

Can my blood still be used if I test positive for antibodies?

If a donor’s blood tests positive for the antibody screen, the red blood cells may still be used for patients. Since antibodies are mostly present in the plasma (the liquid portion of blood), donors with positive antibody screens are asked to donate whole blood or double red cell donations. If your donation tests positive for the antibody screen, the blood center will perform additional testing on the red blood cell component you donated. If this additional testing shows no evidence of the unexpected antibodies in the red blood cell component, it can be used for transfusion.

Donors with positive antibody screens should not donate apheresis platelets due to the high levels of plasma present in these components.

What type of tests are performed on my blood?

Blood donors are confidentially notified of any unusual results found by our blood tests. There is a possibility of false-positive test results with any laboratory test. A positive test may indicate the presence of disease.

Tests performed on every unit of blood:

• ABO and Rh
• Antibody Screening
• HBsAg – Hepatitis B Surface Antigen
• Anti-HBc – Hepatitis B Core Antibodies
• Anti-HCV – Hepatitis C Antibodies
• Anti-HIV 1/2 + O – HIV-1 and HIV-2 Antibodies
• Anti-HTLV-I/II – HTLV-I and HTLV-II Antibodies
• Anti–T. cruzi – T. cruzi Antibodies – The agent that causes Chagas Disease (Tested only on LifeSouth first-time donors)
• HCV and HIV-1 NAT – A Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) that detects the RNA of the Hepatitis C virus and the HIV-1 virus.
• HBV NAT – A Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) that detects the DNA of the Hepatitis B virus.
• Syphilis
• West Nile Virus – A Nucleic Acid Test (NAT) that detects the RNA of the West Nile virus.
• Cholesterol – as a service to our donors

Tests performed on some units of blood:

• Anti-CMV
• Hemoglobin S (Sickle Cell)
• HLA Type – to locate compatible blood components and to match patients with special platelet needs.
• Red Blood Cell Antigen